FRIDAY Fast Five: The sound of music...

So, ah, I totally forgot it was my week for Fast Five. It's been that kind of week - good but buuuuuusaaaaay. So I present you with #fastfivelite inspired by the film I am currently unwinding in front of....

1. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night....a beautiful, strange, moody Iranian vampire flick featuring a skateboarding woman vampire who preys on men who abuse women. The highlight of the film (aside from Arash Marandi - just google him) is a an absolutely kickass soundtrack  that I shall be listening to all weekend.

And in that vein, let's look at music in museums...

2. In my searching I came across an exhibition at my very own, dear Auckland Museum from 2009 called Sonic Museum. According to the article, 

"The aim of the Sonic Museum in Auckland was to find out how the music would alter the experience of looking. They asked nine well known New Zealand artists to compose music for a specific part of the exhibition. Visitors could rent an audio player with headphones at the museum, or download the tracks from the museum website prior to their visit. "

I don't know about you guys but I am here for multi-sensory exhibition experiences. Sound, smell, touch - whatever. And I love the idea of site-specific musical compositions. Cool stuff Tamaki Paenga Hira!

3. We all know about Solange's A Seat at the Table museum tour but let's just leave this here to showcase the magic that can happen when music and museums and goddesses unite.... 

4. Through a discussion of Kraftwerk's performance at the New National Gallery in Berlin and the place of pop music in museums, an article on the Goethe Institute site asks, "Whether at exhibitions or concerts, German museums have been asking in more and more music, whilst music for its part has been increasingly seeking the proximity of museums. A win-win situation for both parties?" It also touches on the increasing interdisciplinary nature of museum work:

"Another trend bringing ever more music into museums is interdisciplinary work, which is growing increasingly popular among curators. One of its pioneers is Okwui Enwezor, Director of the Munich House of Culture. The Nigerian curator wants to convert his institution into “a universal stage on which the visual and performing arts come together”, and asked in an interview with the Süddeutsche Zeitung, “Why should we only present something? Why not also produce it?” 

5. Finishing up with a podcast from WYNC featuring the New York Time's culture reporter Robin Pogrebin discussing the ever-increasing presence of music in New York's museums and galleries,

"You used to see that performance art was marginal, but it's really making its way into the mainstream. It' no longer a separate thing -- and I think music feels like a great equalizer. It's less intimating than some visitors find fine art. What you see in all these exhibitions is a real coalescing of art forms - music, painting, sometimes a live element, video. It's all a big mix now."

And that's all folk. I'm going to leave you with a track from another film I recently watched with a kickass soundtrack...